Lenin’s Mausoleum

Lenin’s Mausoleum

The Mausoleum of Vladimir Lenin, the Soviet leader’s ultimate burial place, is located in the heart of Red Square. Since his death in 1924, his remains has been in the mauseoleum, and while the original idea was for him to be buried after a brief period of public display for sorrow, that plan was immediately revised.

After nearly 100,000 people visited the tomb over the course of six weeks, it was deemed that a new sarcophagus and a more permanent exhibition area would allow Lenin’s body to be preserved for far longer than planned, and Lenin’s Mausoleum was created. Over time, the mauseoleum and its marble stairs became the primary vantage point from which Soviet authorities observed parades and events in Red Square.

Lenin’s embalmed body is still on display today, sleeping in a bulletproof glass sarcophagus. While a visit to the mauseoleum is unique, it has become a must-do for history aficionados interested in learning more about how Lenin’s legacy transformed the country. However, be prepared to wait—there are usually queues to get in.